How to Remove Cat Urine from Leather Furniture

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Christina asked: How do I cat urine from a leather couch? My cat urinated on some clothes that I had sitting on my leather couch. The urine soaked through to the couch, and it smells really bad. I’ve tried all sorts of cleaning products, but yet the smell remains. I’m about to have to throw the couch out. It’s only three years old and was a gift from my hubby, so I really don’t want to do that.

Cat urine contains proteins that create the odor and are difficult to remove. There are products available that will remove these proteins and the odor that lingers.  

Removing Odors with Commercial Products

You Will Need:

  • Nature’s Miracle (available at pet supply stores)
  • Spray bottle (if not provided with odor remover)
  • Leather conditioner

Steps to Remove the Odor:

  1. Disassemble the couch and remove the cushions from the covers (if the urine has soaked through to the cushions). If the odor is only on the cover, it is not necessary to remove the covers.
  2. Soak the cushions with Nature’s Miracle and allow air-dry. Repeat if necessary.
  3. Spray the covers with Nature’s Miracle and allow them to air dry.
  4. Once the odor is removed, reassemble the sofa.
  5. Apply a leather conditioner to the leather to maintain its flexibility.

Removing Odors with a Homemade Remedy

This home remedy does not remove stains, only odor. Always test a small, hidden area of the leather first as hydrogen peroxide can have bleaching effects and may discolor some leathers.

You Will Need:

  • Hydrogen peroxide (3%)
  • Baking soda
  • Liquid soap
  • Small non-metal container
  • Spray bottle
  • Leather conditioner

Steps to Remove the Odor:

  1. Mix together one quart hydrogen peroxide, ¼ cup baking soda and 1 tablespoon liquid soap in a non-metal container. Do not stir or shake vigorously when mixing. Hydrogen peroxide and baking soda create a large amount of oxygen and over mixing will cause the mixture to overflow out of the container.
  2. Place the mixture into a spray bottle and gently mist the affected surfaces.
  3. Blot the areas if needed to remove the moisture.
  4. Allow the area to dry completely.
  5. Apply a leather conditioner to the leather to keep it supple and flexible.

Additional Tips and Advice

  • The proteins in cat urine are similar to those in skunk spray. Cleaning products used to remove the skunk smell can also be used to remove cat urine odors.
  • Cat urine odor must be neutralized with either a commercial product or chemicals that will break up the proteins. Normal washing will remove the stains, but not the odors.

Comments

  1. Carol says:

    In your directions for the homemade remedy to get rid of cat smell on a leather sofa, the list of ingredients does not include vinegar, yet the directions say not to mix it too vigorously due to the reaction of the peroxide and vinegar. Is there indeed meant to be vinegar in the mix or is that a typo? If there is meant to be vinegar, how much? I’d like to try this, but am uncertain as to what to mix.

  2. Heather says:

    I went to the Nature’s Miracle site and they state that their products are NOT recommended on leather…

  3. Charity says:

    I have used Nature’s Miracle on my top-grain leather sofa, and it doesn’t harm it in any way. I follow with leather cleaner and conditioner just to keep it soft, however, I find Nature’s Miracle doesn’t always do what it should, and works better on cloth than leather.

  4. Deb says:

    Our cat is 11 years old, and in the last year she has decided that going poop outside her litter box was the way it was going to be. She has pooped on my leather furniture, and I am unable to get the smell out (I need help). This morning she pooped on my rug by the front door and her litter box was completely clean. I am desperate and need help with our cat, I am on the last straw and I am thinking of getting rid of her, but she is my daughter’s cat and my daughter loves her. Please, please help!

  5. Jess says:

    Perhaps try changing the type of litter you use. See your vet, as well.

  6. Sheila says:

    When you get “old” and have “potty” problems – which you will – should your family consider getting rid of you? I think teaching your daughter that when something or someone becomes inconvenient, to do away with them is an excellent life lesson.

  7. Molly says:

    My cat started going on our furniture because of a health problem. It turned out he had diabetes and his ability to hold and go was lost. The vet saw that inside the mouth or ears was a yellowish color that indicated the liver had stopped functioning properly. Hence, go where they lay.

  8. Bob says:

    Sheila,
    Get off your high horse and stop acting holier-than-thou.

  9. Trish says:

    What Shelia said rather ticked me off. I love my pets like family but I would get rid of one that continued to spray my home or ruin my house. I would try my best to resolve the problem, but if it couldn’t be resolved, I would definitely get them out of my house. Love them or not, the urine and feces does cause health problems in humans as I happen to know first hand. I was lucky and able to fix my past pets’ problem. To make a comment about a person’s parenting skills because they would get rid of a pet before leaving in a home that reeks of animal waste or having their home and furniture ruined is just lousy. Maybe you don’t mind living in a house that smells like an old liter box, but some of us do. That’s just nasty. When we age and have bathroom problems as adults, it doesn’t ruin our furniture or leave permanent odors or damage. What an ignorant, rude jerk you are.

  10. TJ says:

    I followed a very similar “recipe” that I found on another site to clean the urine out of my pillowtop mattress. It smelled perfect afterward. First, I applied the vinegar/water mixture, let it soak in, then dry it out. Next, I used baking soda, then hydrogen peroxide mixed with dishwasher soap (the recipe called for powered but I used liquid just fine) mixed slightly; I soaked it, blotted, and then let it dry. Now, the stain is gone and it smells like “fresh scent.” I didn’t even need to use citrus to mask it.

  11. Al says:

    People with Shelia’s mentality are people who become animal hoarders, or hoarders in general. If something is interfering with your livelihood, get rid of it!

  12. Amanda says:

    Nature’s Miracle doesn’t work for beans! I used almost a whole bottle and it did nothing. The baking soda and peroxide mix didn’t work either. I’m going to try the vinegar mix too; if that doesn’t work, then I’m afraid that my lovely leather chair is ruined.

  13. Debra says:

    One of my cats urinated on my leather sofa in two places. I followed this website’s cleaning instructions and the smell is now completely gone. It is crucial to the cleaning process to follow Nature’s Miracle’s cleaning instructions. I sprayed the leather cover and after 24 hours, there still remained a slight urine odor. So, I repeated the process. This time, after 24 hours, the odor was completely gone. The drying time is important to the process. For me, Nature’s Miracle really worked and saved my leather sofa from being trashed!

  14. Gwennie says:

    I have tried using Nature’s Miracle, but still have lots of work to do. The odor seems to linger and UGH. My leather sofa is also a recliner type – no removable cushions, just a complicated mechanical and leather contraption! I’m having the rug professionally cleaned to remove the smell. Now that it is out of the house, I realize I still have work to do. My kitty did have a urinary tract infection and is better now. Unfortunately, this has been quite an ordeal and a source of terrible stress between my husband and I. As much as I love my kitties, I doubt I’ll ever replace these pets when they are gone.

  15. Heather says:

    Bravo Sheila, for saying what any animal lover was thinking! Completely agree with you, and NO, I am not an “animal hoarder.”
    To Al’s comment, if something (such as an elderly parent or sick child) is interfering with your livelihood, you would “get rid of” your parent or child??? My cats are my children, and I am currently dealing with my eldest at 22 years old (that’s 104 human years old) urinating on our leather couches at the present time (amongst other feline dementia issues). In searching for a good recipe or product online to remove the urine odor, I have to come across horrid people’s comments like these above about simply casting their cat off to the side because of the “inconvenience.” Hello, we are online searching for ways to fully clean and remove our cats’ urine odor, hence we are not living in urine or feces; obviously we have cleaned up the messes thoroughly and are just looking for a good way to completely remove the odor … I do not think the slight stench will kill you until you can find something to remove it! The thought of “getting rid of” my 22-year-old cat, or any age for that matter, has never and would never cross my mind! Shame on people like you, dogging Sheila’s comment … you should be coming down on Deb! You all are the people I have to read about that dump their poor, helpless, innocent animals off to over-crowded shelters because they don’t like the way their animal looked at them, or some other stupid excuse for ruining that poor animal’s life. I do suppose if you are not fit, apparently, to handle taking care of a pet, including seeking veterinary care when needed and providing plenty of love and attention, then you don’t deserve that pet and it probably would be better off without YOU. But then again, you probably do not deserve to be a parent to a human either. And if Trish “loves her pets like family,” I’d hate to be part of her family! Do something wrong and poof, she’ll get rid of you.

    Right on, Sheila, right on. =^.^=

  16. JLyn says:

    Sheila, I have 6 cats and even I can say that getting rid of a cat for this is nowhere near the same thing as getting rid of an older person. What you said was rude, negative, unhelpful, and makes you sound just plain stupid. I cannot stand more than anything when a stupid person tries to sound intelligent. Hilarious. What an intelligent person would do by the way, is give a solution to the question that was asked. Not give a personal opinion on a subject that isn’t being discussed at all. I am an animal lover with 6 cats and 3 dogs (all rescues) and I can confidently say that if one of my cats had an issue that couldn’t be resolved and was affecting my hard-earned lifestyle negatively, I would not let it shit all over my couch because that would be the same thing as my own mother needing to wear a diaper. I feel sorry for you and anyone that has to endure you’re immature thinking in their daily life. Have a great night!!

    Everyone else, thanks for the advice!

  17. JLyn says:

    Heather, first calm down. If Trish didn’t care, she wouldn’t have posted asking for help. Consider her frustration at this point. Maybe everyone isn’t like you and super patient when their animal is pooing and peeing on everything. Maybe Trish has a different perspective because she IS NOT YOU. You, as well, sound like an opinionated bitch that has no solution to offer. And consider for two seconds that no one wants to here your story about your 22-year-old kid that is a cat. HANDICAPPED AND ELDERLY PEOPLE DON’T SHIT AND PEE ALL OVER THE PLACE. PEOPLE ARE NOT THE SAME AS ANIMALS. And if you think so, then no one needs your opinion because it’s an opinion coming from an irrational person.

  18. Crystal G says:

    ^^Jlyn- Thank you, we are on here looking for HELP, not to read all this drama back and forth, trashing others! No one cares about your own personal (and some ignorant) opinions, just reaching out for solutions to a problem. If we weren’t on here doing so, it would mean we threw our pets out!! But we are looking and asking for help, so maybe you people who seem to like to trash and judge should just scroll on and not comment.
    Now, I have a female cat around 1 1/2 years, spayed (and very spoiled), but every so often she pees on something…a towel one of my kids left on the bathroom floor, my leather loveseat (the most recent), a blanket, etc… Now, it was a problem when she would go into heat and we got her fixed a few months back and she is doing it again. On top of trying to get the smell out of my couch, any ideas of why she is still doing this? ONLY HELPFUL COMMENTS PLEASE – no negative junk!

  19. Janet says:

    Thanks for all your tips everyone. I have new leather theater recliners that I recently splurged on and my old rescue cat accidentally got shut in the room overnight. She urinated on the blanket that was on the cushion and it leaked through. I will give these suggestions a try. Thanks from Colorado.

  20. Butch says:

    CRYSTAL G,
    Is there anything common that happens around the times the cat does that? Something either physcially or environmentally is causing the cat to do that. For us, it was adding a puppy to the household who loved chasing the cats and playing. We had to learn how to make sure the cats had places to escape, along with teaching the dog not to play so rough and our problem stopped. Watch “My Cat From Hell” on Animal Planet. He deals with these type situations all the time and we learned a lot from it. So, look for ways the cat may be stressed or upset around these times it happens. Also check with the vet to see if it may be a physcial issue like something causing urinary tract issues. There is a reason for it and can be stopped.

  21. Constance says:

    When I relocated due to illness, had to drive my roadster from the East Coast back to the Midwest (my nephew did the driving). The car only has two seats, and Max, my 17-year-old cat, was either on my lap or on the floor with his blanket along with my purse… LONG story short, Max somehow peed in my purse (a $300.00 designer bag)! Granted, it’s a pretty big purse, but I’m still wondering how he managed to pee with me right there the entire time! We made frequent stops throughout our trip & had several disposable litter boxes, which I begged, coaxed and even left him alone for privacy (tied his leash to a bench away from everything) & put his clean litter box close by (his bottled water & fresh food was in a different area). The ONLY time he used any of those boxes were when we were in a hotel! I did an online search & went through several steps and all the odor was gone!
    It had worked!!! I remember using activated charcoal, borax, baking soda, leather cleaner & a solution from the pet store which is used to remove pet odors, a large plastic bag and a box with lid. I wish I didn’t have MS or I may have remembered the process, which lasted over two weeks. BUT, my point in writing this is to let you know that it IS possible to get rid of that horrible smell. Today, my handbag looks great & believe it or not, it smells like brand new leather!!! SOOO, get a mug of coffee, put on some music & get to Google! Good luck :-)

  22. Sid says:

    As a former Marine and K9 handler. I “APPLAUD & ECHO” both Sheilla and Heather’s comment! I am a diabetic myself (along with additional health issues), and I sometimes do without the things I need to simply ensure that my four-pawed loved ones are properly cared for. Animals are dependent on us. They can’t go to the fridge or pantry to feed themselves, or the faucet to get a drink when thirsty, or open the door to go outside to relieve themselves or get fresh air, etc. and what they WON’T DO that HUMANS WILL, is turncoat, cast you aside or one day determine you to be an inconvenience to them!!!!! They will remain by your side “do or die!” So to sum it up! To all the people who find an animal to be an inconvenience due to age or an odor issue… perhaps that lingering odor “is not” from your animal, but your selfish “decaying heart!” And no product in the world can eliminate that smell!!!!! SEMPER FI

  23. Angela says:

    I was told to check this out by mother-in-law, since our cat peed on my leather jacket. Vinegar works miracles on clothes for pet odors, as well as b.o., but I wasn’t sure if it was safe for leather. My daughter, when potty training, pooped smack dab in the middle of an area rug, which I told my ex not to put out till both kids were potty trained. I laughed. Things are just things. What’s more important here? Stuff that can always be replaced, or living, breathing. companions? I would no sooner get rid of the cat than my child. Our cat, however, will be neutered because that is something I can do to remedy the situation.

  24. Giovana says:

    Wow! People! I found this site because my lovely cat just peed on my leather tote bag…I was so mad at her…and then I realized that while I was on the phone with the bedroom door shut (not usual) because I was on an important private call…she was meowing to get out and I ignored her…so…she peed on my bag.
    There is always a reason why they do these things, not just to inconvenience us. She can’t hold it like she used to so that is another reason, not spite. I will try this Nature’s Miracle; thank you all for your input. I have to add that what some of you said about getting rid of animals that are too much work or interfering with your livelihood made me sad. I would hope at least you would take the time to find a loving home if you could not provide one. Be in peace everyone…we all need to step it up and be kind to all living things or this planet will shake us all off.

  25. Mary says:

    My cat just peed on my new leather couch for no reason. She had been doing this at my old house on different things. I moved and bought everything new and she’s had no accidents for two months. Now, she was asleep on one couch, walked over onto the other and peed in front of us! I’ve bought carpets and a new mattress and am worried!! She is old. :(

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