How to Remove Stains from Cultured Marble

culturedmarble

Julie asked: How do I clean stains in cultured marble sinks? I have a grayish ring-type stained area around the drain area of my cultured marble, bathroom sink. Do you know how I can clean this stain?

Cultured marble is a beautiful stone, but one that requires special care to keep it in good condition. A stain around the drain is likely from mineral deposits from the water that commonly sits in that area. Below are two stain removal methods: one for removing mineral deposits and the other for removing general stains.

Removing Water Deposit Stains

You Will Need:

  • Vinegar
  • Barkeeper’s Friend
  • Marble cleaner and polish
  • Water
  • Soft cloths

Steps to Remove the Stains:

  1. Moisten a soft cloth with white vinegar.
  2. Lay the cloth on top of the hard water stains.
  3. Allow it to set for several hours.
  4. Remove and rinse completely with cold water.
  5. If the stain remains, make a paste of water and Barkeeper’s Friend.
  6. Apply the paste and allow it to set on the stain for several hours to overnight.
  7. Rinse with cold water.
  8. Follow up with a marble cleaner and polish, if desired.

Removing Everyday Stains

You Will Need:

  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Ammonia
  • Vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Water
  • Rubber gloves
  • Soft cloths

Steps to Remove the Stains:

  1. For dark stains, soak a cloth with hydrogen peroxide.
  2. Lay the wet cloth on top of the stain.
  3. Allow it to set overnight.
  4. Rinse completely with cold water.
  5. If the stain remains, mix the following items in a bucket:
    • ¼ cup baking soda
    • ¼ cup vinegar
    • ½ cup ammonia
    • 8 cups hot water
  6. Allow the mixture to foam.
  7. Use a soft cloth or sponge to apply the mixture to the stains.
  8. Allow it to set for five minutes.
  9. Rinse completely with cold water.

Additional Tips and Advice

  • Bleach can also be placed on a cloth and set on top of the stain to soak – but do not allow the bleach to mix with ammonia under any conditions!
  • As with any cleaning product, test a small area first to ensure there are no adverse effects to the marble, coloring or surface.
  • If the stains are not removed with the above stain removal methods, it may have to be buffed out of the marble. Once completed the marble will have to be refinished. This is a job that needs to be completed by a professional.

Comments

  1. Patricia says:

    In regards to the question from Julie on how to remove stains from cultured marble: I have tried all of the above suggestions and nothing works on my bathroom sink. There is never water standing in the sink. I clean the sink weekly with a special marble cleaner, and I wipe the sink dry each time it is used. The stain is smooth to the touch and seems to be deep within the marble. I checked with a cultured marble dealer, and they said the only solution is to replace it.

  2. John says:

    I had burn marks on a cultured marble countertop that were caused by a young teenage daughter who mistakenly left her straightening iron sitting directly on top of it. I used a dishrag and glass cooktop cleaner to remove most of the burn with no problem whatsoever. The mild liquid abrasive did not need a moist rag; I was patient and used on a little of the glass cooktop cleaner at a time, repeating the process until the burn did not show. The countertop was not scratched by the this process, whatsoever.

    Part of the burn was more pronounced, so I used a mild scouring pad (like the green ones used for dishes) along with the glass cooktop cleaner. Being patient and using a little of the glass cooktop cleaner at a time, I removed the entire burn mark with no problem. Again, the countertop was not scratched – in fact, the process removed all the little scratch marks that show up on faux marble after years of use. This process restored the luster, removed the burn marks and actually made the countertop look brand new!

  3. Heather says:

    Hello, I just wanted to let all of you frustrated people out there know that I couldn’t get a purple dye out of my cultured marble sink; I tried everything! The list could go on! The only thing that worked for me was my husband’s Goof Off in a spray bottle! :) It is a miracle! Good luck!

  4. Kelly says:

    We are replacing the trim faucets of our bathtub, and the new faucets do not cover the entire area of the old faucets. The old faucets left a yellow color on our tan-colored cultured marble. Obviously, I want to get rid of the yellow without damaging the surface so we can use the new fixtures. Any suggestions?

  5. Saul says:

    It is always a good idea to seek the advice of a professional marble cleaning specialist; they will have the experience and knowledge to offer the best stain removal service with lasting results. Each stone type is so different, so there is a requirement to use products that match cultured marble.

  6. Angel says:

    Has anyone ever tried to use a household steam machine? I just purchased one, very inexpensive, and have yet to try it on my marble sink.

    Thanks,
    Angel

  7. Melanie says:

    Angel,
    A home steam cleaner is a recommended way to clean marble, however, overuse (daily, etc.) of the steam cleaner can be damaging to the stone. You should only need to use the steam cleaner for deep cleanings of the sink though, so it should be not only fine, but a great asset.

    Source: Stone & Tile Pros – Marble / Granite Cleaning – Is it safe to use steam cleaner on marble shower walls / floors and granite countertops
    Source: eHow – How to Steam Clean Marble
    Source: Apex Marble – Tips to Care for Your Stone

  8. Donna says:

    DO NOT USE VINEGAR!!!! IT DESTROYED MY COUNTER AND BEAUTIFUL SINK. I had a few stains on my sink and counter…took the top layer off and now it is completely discolored and not even smooth. It is UGLY.

  9. CJ says:

    Toothpaste removes stains from cultured marble.

  10. Claire says:

    I read the instructions and the comments.
    Here is what I did and the results:
    First, I tried the toothpaste with old toothbrush… it worked well on the lighter stains around the bathroom sink drain.
    Then, I applied the Barkeeper’s Friend paste to the remaining third of the ring.
    Gone!!! Beautiful and white; looks brand new! This stain has been here for several years. I’m so pleased! No scratching either.
    Thanks everyone for your input.

  11. Dino says:

    What is Barkeepers Friend? Thanks Claire.

  12. Melanie says:

    Dino,
    Bar Keepers Friend is a household cleaning product. You can find out more information about it at http://www.barkeepersfriend.com.

  13. Sheran says:

    I was always told toothpaste is considered abrasive…do we have any facts on this, please? My side of the marble sink has no stains, but his side does. The only thing I can think of is that he shaves and it must be his shaving cream???!! Just so afraid I’ll damage the marble and lose the shine. Any suggestions will be appreciated. We also have the bronze faucets and accessories from Lowes…any safe suggestions to clean those will also be appreciated. Thanks everybody. Nothing more helpful than true facts of people trying and sharing their cleaning experiences. Will anxiously await help on my inquiries. Have a wonderful cleaning day… ; )

  14. Melanie says:

    Sheran,
    Toothpaste is a mild abrasive. According to Wikipedia, “Abrasives constitute at least 50% of a typical toothpaste.”
    Consider getting your man a gel shaving cream to use instead and see if the staining continues. If your marble cleaner does not remove the stains, the article How to Remove Shaving Cream from Vinyl Siding might help.
    For the bronze faucets, the articles How to Clean Bronze and How to Clean Bronze Flatware might help.

    Source: Wikipedie – Toothpaste

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